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Nicholas Holloway Lucy Harwood Benton End Cedric Morris Maggi Hambling paintings

Lucy Harwood (1893-1972)

 

The Harvest

signed to the reverse on stretcher bar

oil on canvas

16 x 20 inches

 

Price: Sold

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A super example of Lucy Harwood's stylized work with her characteristically bold palette and flamboyant impasto.

 

Lucy Harwood was brought up at Belstead Hall, near Ipswich and later at Ackworth House in East Bergholt. She studied at the Slade before the 1st World War and much later in life joined the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing when it was opened by Cedric Morris in 1937. The school was burnt to the ground in 1939 (allegedly the fire had been started by Lucian Freud whilst a pupil there). She stayed with the school in its re-incarnation at Benton End, near Hadleigh. The school became as well known for its wild parties as it did for the talented artists (Maggi Hambling,  amongst many others) that it produced and Lucy Harwood was central to its social life, although bringing a degree of decorum by her insistence on a formal afternoon tea every Sunday.

 

Works in Public collections: Colchester and Ipswich Museums Collection and elsewhere.

A super example of Lucy Harwood's stylized work with her characteristically bold palette and flamboyant impasto.

 

Lucy Harwood was brought up at Belstead Hall, near Ipswich and later at Ackworth House in East Bergholt. She studied at the Slade before the 1st World War and much later in life joined the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing when it was opened by Cedric Morris in 1937. The school was burnt to the ground in 1939 (allegedly the fire had been started by Lucian Freud whilst a pupil there). She stayed with the school in its re-incarnation at Benton End, near Hadleigh. The school became as well known for its wild parties as it did for the talented artists (Maggi Hambling,  amongst many others) that it produced and Lucy Harwood was central to its social life, although bringing a degree of decorum by her insistence on a formal afternoon tea every Sunday.

 

Works in Public collections: Colchester and Ipswich Museums Collection and elsewhere.

A super example of Lucy Harwood's stylized work with her characteristically bold palette and flamboyant impasto.

 

Lucy Harwood was brought up at Belstead Hall, near Ipswich and later at Ackworth House in East Bergholt. She studied at the Slade before the 1st World War and much later in life joined the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing when it was opened by Cedric Morris in 1937. The school was burnt to the ground in 1939 (allegedly the fire had been started by Lucian Freud whilst a pupil there). She stayed with the school in its re-incarnation at Benton End, near Hadleigh. The school became as well known for its wild parties as it did for the talented artists (Maggi Hambling,  amongst many others) that it produced and Lucy Harwood was central to its social life, although bringing a degree of decorum by her insistence on a formal afternoon tea every Sunday.

 

Works in Public collections: Colchester and Ipswich Museums Collection and elsewhere.

A super example of Lucy Harwood's stylized work with her characteristically bold palette and flamboyant impasto.

 

Lucy Harwood was brought up at Belstead Hall, near Ipswich and later at Ackworth House in East Bergholt. She studied at the Slade before the 1st World War and much later in life joined the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing when it was opened by Cedric Morris in 1937. The school was burnt to the ground in 1939 (allegedly the fire had been started by Lucian Freud whilst a pupil there). She stayed with the school in its re-incarnation at Benton End, near Hadleigh. The school became as well known for its wild parties as it did for the talented artists (Maggi Hambling,  amongst many others) that it produced and Lucy Harwood was central to its social life, although bringing a degree of decorum by her insistence on a formal afternoon tea every Sunday.

 

Works in Public collections: Colchester and Ipswich Museums Collection and elsewhere.

A super example of Lucy Harwood's stylized work with her characteristically bold palette and flamboyant impasto.

 

Lucy Harwood was brought up at Belstead Hall, near Ipswich and later at Ackworth House in East Bergholt. She studied at the Slade before the 1st World War and much later in life joined the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing when it was opened by Cedric Morris in 1937. The school was burnt to the ground in 1939 (allegedly the fire had been started by Lucian Freud whilst a pupil there). She stayed with the school in its re-incarnation at Benton End, near Hadleigh. The school became as well known for its wild parties as it did for the talented artists (Maggi Hambling,  amongst many others) that it produced and Lucy Harwood was central to its social life, although bringing a degree of decorum by her insistence on a formal afternoon tea every Sunday.

 

Works in Public collections: Colchester and Ipswich Museums Collection and elsewhere.